Meet Our Summer 2023 Resident Fellows

The Lunder Institute for American Art is excited to welcome a new cohort of resident fellows to take up residence in Waterville for a summer of collaboration and community building.

Established in 2021, Lunder Institute residential fellowships provide artists with spacious studios as well as opportunities for collaboration with Colby College faculty, students, and staff, the Waterville community, and the Maine arts community. This studio program, based out of the Greene Block + Studios in downtown Waterville, Maine, encompasses artists at all stages of their careers and working in a range of artistic disciplines and mediums. Resident fellows are provided with housing and a stipend, have access to Colby College campus facilities, and are in dialogue with local organizations and community members.

This summer, resident fellows will also engage with our chefs in residence and participate in the Lunder Institute’s inaugural Summer Think Tank program, a new initiative aimed at providing a safe and fertile space for invited guests, including artists, scholars, and other thought leaders and cultural workers to be in conversation about relevant and urgent questions and topics in the field of American art. 

Joining the program this year are Genevieve Gaignard, a multidisciplinary artist who uses self-portraiture, collage, sculpture and installation to elicit dialogue around the intricacies of race, beauty and cultural identity, and Papay Solomon, a visual artist who marshals the language of portraiture to complexify African narratives beyond dominant discourses.

Learn more about this group of artists and read their bios on our Summer 2023 Resident Fellows page.

Image: Genevieve Gaignard (left) and Papay Solomon.

Oscar Santillán on Art and AI

On Monday, April 10, the Colby College Museum of Art’s Lunder Institute for American Art presented a panel discussion to culminate the work of Lunder Institute senior fellow Oscar Santillán.

As one of five awardees of the Holt/Smithson Foundation’s grant prize to create a project around Little Island, Santillán discussed his work with Colby undergraduate research assistants, in collaboration with the Davis Institute for Artificial Intelligence, to bring his project to fruition.

Joining the panel were Lisa Le Feuvre, executive director of the Holt/Smithson Foundation, to share more about the origin of the award, Little Island’s history, the other selected artists, as well as her work and highlights with Oscar over the course of their collaboration.

Amanda Stent, director of the Davis Institute for Artificial Intelligence, also joined the discussion, along with Erica Wall, Lunder Institute director.

Taryn D. Jordan and Bryant Terry Dish on Food Justice

On Monday evening, April 3, Taryn D. Jordan, professor of women’s studies at Colgate University, joined chef, food justice activist, artist, critically acclaimed author, and community builder Bryant Terry for a conversation about food inequality, Black food, and history.

Terry fights for a more just and sustainable food system. His work illuminates the intersections that exist between poverty, structural racism, and food insecurity, in order to pave a new path forward. In his new book Black Food, he offers a stunning and deeply heartfelt tribute to Black culinary ingenuity, capturing the broad and divergent voices of the African Diaspora in a way that’s never been done before.

This event was part of the Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities’ annual theme, Food for Thought, which seeks to problematize and critically assess the complex social, cultural, environmental, political relationships we have with food.

This program was sponsored by the Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities with support from the African American studies department, the Colby Arts Office, the Cultural Events Committee, the Colby College Museum of Art’s Lunder Institute for American Art, the Office of the President, and the Office of the Provost. 

Chef/Restaurant Career Path Webinar

As a kickoff to its pilot chef in residence program, the Lunder Institute for American Art is partnering with DavisConnects to present a webinar for Colby students and others interested in careers in the culinary arts.

On Thursday, April 6, 7–8 pm, spend an hour with four accomplished chefs to learn more about what it takes to pursue a career as a chef or restauranteur. This virtual event will include introductory remarks by each panelist, opening questions about each chef’s individual path, and an opportunity for attendees to ask questions.

The four panelists are:

Jordan Benissan, chef and owner of Mé Lon Togo, a West African themed restaurant in Rockland, Maine.

Dave Mallari, chef and owner of the Sinful Kitchen in Portland, Maine, and a former Chopped contestant.

Louis Pickens, chef and owner of Black Betty’s Bistro, a catering kitchen and restaurant based in Portland, Maine.

Ben Wexler-Waite, a Colby College alumnus and chef-owner of Il Leone, a seasonal, outdoor pizzeria located on Peaks Island, Maine.

Join live via Zoom.

Art + AI: Panel Discussion with Oscar Santillán

Greene Block + Studios
Monday, April 10, 6–7pm

The Lunder Institute for American Art is pleased to present a panel discussion to culminate the work of Lunder Institute senior fellow Oscar Santillán.
As one of five awardees of the Holt/Smithson Foundation’s grant prize to create a project around Little Island, Santillán will discuss and present his work with Colby undergraduate research assistants, in collaboration with the Davis Institute for Artificial Intelligence, to bring his project to fruition.
Joining the panel will be Lisa Le Feuvre, executive director of the Holt/Smithson Foundation, to share more about the origin of the award, Little Island’s history, the other selected artists, as well as her work and highlights with Oscar over the course of their collaboration.
Amanda Stent, director of the Davis Institute for Artificial Intelligence, will also be part of the discussion, along with Erica Wall, Lunder Institute director, who will facilitate the discussion.
Come and learn more about the work of Lunder Institute senior fellows, and the impact their work can have across multiple disciplines.
For those unable to attend in person, this even will also be livestreamed at colby.edu/livestream.

Lunder Institute Announces Chef in Residence Program

The Lunder Institute for American art is excited to announce a pilot chef in residence program. Acknowledging the impact of the culinary arts within the art world, and Colby’s unique position, both figuratively and literally, to the superior culinary community that exists in Maine and, specifically, Portland, the Lunder Institute seeks to create opportunities to engage with culinary artists around food, it’s making, its origin, its impact, and its influence.

The Lunder Institute is committed to acknowledging, exploring, and representing the broadest understanding and reflection of American art. This unique opportunity allows our campus community, as well as the wider Waterville community, to understand the greater relationship between food and its culture in American art, and how that relationship impacts the ways we understand our American history, our history with food, our history with the land, and the history between the cultures and people of America.

­Starting in April, the Lunder Institute will invite three culinary artists—Jordan Benissan, chef and owner of Mé Lon Togo, a West African themed restaurant in Rockland, Maine, Dave Mallari, chef and owner of the Sinful Kitchen in Portland, Maine, and a former Chopped contestant, and Louis Pickens, chef and owner of Black Betty’s Bistro, a catering kitchen and restaurant based in Portland, Maine—to present a supper club featuring dishes inspired by a work from the Colby College Museum of Art’s American art collection. Each artist will spend a week in residence in preparation for an evening for 12 strangers to share in food, conversation, and community.

The Lunder Institute will partner with DavisConnects, Colby’s career center, to offer more discussion around pathways within the food industry and the culinary arts and will offer a panel, on April 6 to introduce the three Lunder Institute chefs in residence to the community and to learn more about their practice, their career paths, and their work.

The Lunder Institute for American art will invite these three chefs back during the summer to offer supper clubs and participate in the Lunder Institute for American Art Summer Think Tank: ____________ American 2023. During this time, the chefs will interact with thought partners across disciplines, within the arts and beyond, to further the discourse around the relationship between the culinary arts, the history of food, land history and ownership, farming, and how that has impacted and influenced art practice for generations.

Image (Left to Right): Dave Mallari, Jordan Benissan, and Louis Pickens. 

Bryant Terry in Conversation with Dr. Taryn Jordan

Greene Block + Studios, 18 Main Street, Waterville
Monday, April 3, 6:30–7:30pm

Join chef, food justice activist, artist, critically acclaimed author, and community builder Bryant Terry for a conversation with Taryn D. Jordan, professor of women’s studies at Colgate University, about food inequality, Black food, and history.

Terry fights for a more just and sustainable food system. His work illuminates the intersections that exist between poverty, structural racism, and food insecurity, in order to pave a new path forward. In his new book Black Food, he offers a stunning and deeply heartfelt tribute to Black culinary ingenuity, capturing the broad and divergent voices of the African Diaspora in a way that’s never been done before.

This event is part of the Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities’ annual theme, Food for Thought, which seeks to problematize and critically assess the complex social, cultural, environmental, political relationships we have with food.

Local food vendors will be on-hand provide food for this event.

This program is sponsored by the Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities with support from the African American studies department, the Colby Arts Office, the Cultural Events Committee, the Colby College Museum of Art’s Lunder Institute for American Art, the Office of the President, and the Office of the Provost. 

Watch Genevieve Gaignard and Jon Gray in Conversation

On March 16, 2023, multidisciplinary artist Genevieve Gaignard, a spring 2023 resident fellow at the Lunder Institute for American Art, and Jon Gray, multidisciplinary curator and co-founder of the culinary collective Ghetto Gastro joined Lunder Institute director Erica Wall for a conversation about their artistic practice.

As longtime friends and colleagues, Gaignard and Gray each work in their own ways to “Change the Conversation,” seeking to shift social and historical narratives around such subjects as race and identity through innovation across mediums.

Jon Gray is a curator, entrepreneur, and co-founder of the Bronx-born culinary collective Ghetto Gastro. Gray aims to shift social narratives, blending a background in fashion to create immersive experiences, product design, and unique storytelling. From Co-Op City, Gray’s mother and grandmother taught him about the arts and challenged him to innovate as a way of life. When a rebellious adolescence almost put him behind bars, Gray used the experience to imagine a greater vision for himself. Inventorying his passions and pastimes, he made Bronx-driven gastro-diplomacy his career and mission.

In 2019, Gray delivered his noteworthy TED Talk, “The next big thing is coming from the Bronx, again.” Gray is a Civic Practice Partnership Artist in Residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In 2021, he served as guest curator at the Cooper-Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, where “Jon Gray of Ghetto Gastro Selects” featured an Afrofuturist theme. He is an avid art collector and people connector.

Genevieve Gaignard (b.1981) is a multidisciplinary artist who uses self-portraiture, collage, sculpture, and installation to elicit dialogue around the intricacies of race, beauty, and cultural identity. Referencing regional and historical events, as well as a personal archive as a biracial woman, Gaignard creates environments that teeter between symbolic and autobiographical realms. She cleverly interrogates notions of skin privilege while challenging viewers to look more closely at racial realities. The ensemble of her work shatters viewers’ perceptions of culture and race, compelling them to piece together novel ways of perceiving the world and their place in it.

Since 2019, Gaignard has debuted six solo exhibitions and participated in numerous countrywide group shows. Last year, she presented two solo exhibitions: To Whom it May Concern with Rowan University Art Gallery and Strange Fruit with Vielmetter Los Angeles. Gaignard’s work has appeared at: The Broad, CA; The Nerman Museum, KS; Stephen Friedman Gallery, UK; The Museum of Fine Arts Houston, TX; The Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, DC; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CA; The Getty Center, CA; The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, MA; and Prospect.4, LA. In July 2022, Gaignard partnered with Orange Barrel Media on Look At Them Look At Us: a permanent, site-specific public art installation in downtown Atlanta. Gaignard received her bachelor of fine arts in photography from Massachusetts College of Art and Design and her master of fine arts in photography from Yale University. She splits her time between her hometown of Orange, Mass, and Los Angeles.

First Friday, Downtown Waterville: Lunder Institute Open Studios

Meet the current cohort of Lunder Institute for American Art resident fellows at the Greene Block + Studios. This semester’s fellows are Tessa Greene O’Brien, a painter and curator, Dylan Hausthor, a photographer and printmaker, and Heather Flor Cron, a farmer, performer, and artist. Come and talk to these artists about their work and see their in-progress art. This program is part of the monthly First Friday offerings across downtown Waterville.

First Fridays celebrate the vibrant creativity of Waterville by inviting people downtown to engage in multidisciplinary arts experiences. On the first Friday of every month, visit downtown Waterville to meet artists, participate in workshops, listen to live music, eat delicious local food, and come together as a community. To learn more, visit the Waterville Creates website.

Tessa Greene O’Brien with a recent painting. Photography by Amanda Mao, Class of 2026.

Student Internship Opportunities with Senior Fellow Oscar Santillán

The Lunder Institute for American Art and Buck Lab are seeking 2 research interns to work closely with Lunder Institute Senior Fellow Oscar Santillán via zoom/email for the 2023 spring semester.

His practice emerges from the notion of “Antimundo,” which he understands as “a way of identifying and generating realities that do not fit in the world.” For this purpose, he has resorted to forms of knowledge production and imaginaries overlooked by mainstream Western thinking, such as cybernetics, science fiction, ancient cosmologies, a more inclusive history of science and plant intelligence.

Interns will support Oscar Santillán, who will be working remotely, with his research and support him to develop and pilot a project that conjures Little Fort Island, in Downeast Maine as a sentient entity and imagines the possibilities of communication and expression among biological, technological, human and animal realms. Interns will be paid on an hourly basis.

There are 2 internships available:

The ideal candidates for these internships will have a programming foundation, at least to use this project as a learning experience by expanding current programming knowledge and understanding of the connection between ecology and emerging technologies. The ability to work independently and meet deadlines is critical.

Research Intern Position 1: ES Qualifications

  • Find ways to map out and organize the available real-time environmental data
  • Write a short report on the ecology around the region where Little Fort Island is located
  • Get in touch with initiatives in the US and Canada advocating for the Rights of Nature in search for a potential collaboration conducive to explore if Little Fort Island could be, eventually, granted personhood
  • Collaborate with CS intern in some additional tasks such as integrating the environmental data with the neural networks
  • Post/upload research and progress on an IVM website (which will be launched soon)

Research Intern Position 2: CS Qualifications

  • Create a coherent dataset mixing texts by artists Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson
  • Find interesting ways of activating this dataset by means of GPT3 or other language models.
  • Find the way in which the voices of both artists can be integrated (i.e. by means of VALL-E and/or other software)
  • Put together the whole pipeline (real-time environmental data > AI > real-time audio)

General Skills: Basic programming, research, database entry, proofing, and copy editing, Adobe Premiere, etc; expected to meet with the Institute fellows via Zoom; to participate in one or two scheduled events related to their April visit to the Colby campus; and to check in with their LIAA and Buck Lab supervisor and Oscar Santillán on a weekly basis via email and through monthly in-person meetings. 

Students can apply through Workday, where more information about the responsibilities of these roles can be found, and/or contact [email protected] with questions. Applicants are encouraged to apply by Friday, February 24th. Please include a cover letter, resume and names of 1 to 2 references. Decision will be made by March 1st.

Suggested Prerequisite: Jan Plan Course with Oscar Santillán. 

Image: Oscar Santillán with students in his 2023 Jan Plan course “Antimundo.”

Art& Changing the Conversation: Jon Gray and Genevieve Gaignard

Thursday, March 16, 6 pm
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art & Music Center, Colby College

The Colby College Museum of Art and its Lunder Institute for American Art are excited to announce a live conversation between multidisciplinary artist Genevieve Gaignard, a spring 2023 resident fellow at the Lunder Institute for American Art, and Jon Gray, multidisciplinary curator and co-founder of the culinary collective Ghetto Gastro.

As longtime friends and colleagues, Gaignard and Gray each work through their respective practices on “Changing the Conversation,” seeking to shift social and historical narratives around such subjects as race and identity through innovation across mediums.

This conversation, facilitated by Lunder Institute director Erica Wall, brings their two voices together to share how, when, and why the work they do seeks to interrogate and transform the how, when, and why of what we see, do, and say.

Learn how their work helps to expand the discourse around the ways in which the complexity of the American experience, its art, and its culture are evolving, shaping American visual culture and impacting American art.

The Art & series brings together visiting artists, scholars, museum staff, and community experts for conversations about exhibitions, collections, and projects at the Colby College Museum of Art and its Lunder Institute for American Art. A mix of in-person, virtual, and hybrid programs, this series is designed for those interested in learning more about art and engaging with the key issues of our time.

Jon Gray is a curator, entrepreneur, and co-founder of the Bronx-born culinary collective Ghetto Gastro. Gray aims to shift social narratives, blending a background in fashion to create immersive experiences, product design, and unique storytelling. From Co-Op City, Gray’s mother and grandmother taught him about the arts and challenged him to innovate as a way of life. When a rebellious adolescence almost put him behind bars, Gray used the experience to imagine a greater vision for himself. Inventorying his passions and pastimes, he made Bronx-driven gastro-diplomacy his career and mission.

In 2019, Gray delivered his noteworthy TED Talk, “The next big thing is coming from the Bronx, again.” Gray is a Civic Practice Partnership Artist in Residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In 2021, he served as guest curator at the Cooper-Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, where “Jon Gray of Ghetto Gastro Selects” featured an Afrofuturist theme. He is an avid art collector and people connector.

Genevieve Gaignard (b.1981) is a multidisciplinary artist who uses self-portraiture, collage, sculpture, and installation to elicit dialogue around the intricacies of race, beauty, and cultural identity. Referencing regional and historical events, as well as a personal archive as a biracial woman, Gaignard creates environments that teeter between symbolic and autobiographical realms. She cleverly interrogates notions of skin privilege while challenging viewers to look more closely at racial realities. The ensemble of her work shatters viewers’ perceptions of culture and race, compelling them to piece together novel ways of perceiving the world and their place in it.

Since 2019, Gaignard has debuted six solo exhibitions and participated in numerous countrywide group shows. Last year, she presented two solo exhibitions: To Whom it May Concern with Rowan University Art Gallery and Strange Fruit with Vielmetter Los Angeles. Gaignard’s work has appeared at: The Broad, CA; The Nerman Museum, KS; Stephen Friedman Gallery, UK; The Museum of Fine Arts Houston, TX; The Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, DC; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CA; The Getty Center, CA; The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, MA; and Prospect.4, LA. In July 2022, Gaignard partnered with Orange Barrel Media on Look At Them Look At Us: a permanent, site-specific public art installation in downtown Atlanta. Gaignard received her bachelor of fine arts in photography from Massachusetts College of Art and Design and her master of fine arts in photography from Yale University. She splits her time between her hometown of Orange, Mass, and Los Angeles.

This program is free and open to all. While in-person attendance is strongly encouraged, the program will also be available via Zoom. A reception will follow in the museum lobby.

Images: Genevieve Gaignard, photography by Charlsie Gorski; Jon Gray.

Lunder Institute for American Art Welcomes Genevieve Gaignard

The Lunder Institute for American Art is excited to announce that multidisciplinary artist Genevieve Gaignard will visit for two weeks in the month of March to work with Waterville area students, Colby students, and local community. She will return as a resident fellow for the summer and fall of 2023.

As part of her spring residency, Gaignard will participate in a live conversation with Jon Gray, curator and co-founder of the culinary collective Ghetto Gastro.

Established in 2021, Lunder Institute residential fellowships provide artists with spacious studios as well as opportunities for collaboration with Colby College faculty, students, and staff, the Waterville community, and the Maine arts community. This studio program, based out of the Greene Block + Studios in downtown Waterville, Maine, encompasses artists at all stages of their careers and working in a range of artistic disciplines and mediums. Resident fellows are provided with housing and a stipend, have access to Colby College campus facilities, and are in dialogue with local organizations and community members.

Gaignard (b.1981) uses self-portraiture, collage, sculpture, and installation to elicit dialogue around the intricacies of race, beauty, and cultural identity. Referencing regional and historical events, as well as a personal archive as a biracial woman, Gaignard creates environments that teeter between symbolic and autobiographical realms. She cleverly interrogates notions of skin privilege while challenging viewers to look more closely at racial realities. The ensemble of her work shatters viewers’ perceptions of culture and race, compelling them to piece together novel ways of perceiving the world and their place in it.

Since 2019, Gaignard has debuted six solo exhibitions and participated in numerous countrywide group shows. Last year, she presented two solo exhibitions: To Whom it May Concern with Rowan University Art Gallery and Strange Fruit with Vielmetter Los Angeles. Gaignard’s work has appeared at: The Broad, CA; The Nerman Museum, KS; Stephen Friedman Gallery, UK; The Museum of Fine Arts Houston, TX; The Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, DC; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CA; The Getty Center, CA; The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, MA; and Prospect.4, LA. In July 2022, Gaignard partnered with Orange Barrel Media on Look At Them Look At Us: a permanent, site-specific public art installation in downtown Atlanta. Gaignard received her bachelor of fine arts in photography from Massachusetts College of Art and Design and her master of fine arts in photography from Yale University. She splits her time between her hometown of Orange, Mass, and Los Angeles.

Gaignard will join current residential fellows Heather Flor Cron, a queer Peruvian-American farmer, performer & transdisciplinary artist based in Portland, Tessa Greene O’Brien, a Maine-based artist and curator with a multi-faceted painting practice, and Dylan Hausthor, an artist based on the coast of Maine, who joined the Lunder Institute’s residential fellowship program during the fall 2022 semester.

Learn more about this group of artists and read their bios on our Spring 2023 Resident Fellows page.

Image: Genevieve Gaignard, photography by Charlsie Gorski.

Oscar Santillán: Teaching ‘Antimundo’ in the Classroom

Lunder Institute Senior Fellow Oscar Santillán has recently completed teaching a Jan Plan course for Colby students seeking to learn more about how we relate to technology. Jan Plan, a month-long exploratory term before the Spring semester, gives Colby students the opportunity to explore special topics that are not ordinarily offered during traditional academic semesters. Often, these classes break the mold of the standard college course—Santillán’s offering was no exception. 

Santillán’s course was titled “Antimundo,” reflecting the name of his studio and the conceptual framework that shapes his practice. ‘Antimundo’ accepts science, fiction, and non-human perspectives all at once, a way of embracing realities that do not fit in our current world. The course syllabus gives more detail:

This course is about the future; the future here is understood as the potential for other configurations of the world which have been forgotten, repressed, or poorly understood, such as indigenous technologies. The course departs from two main ideas; the first one is ‘Antimundo’, which is a conceptual approach towards diverse forms of human knowing beyond modern Western ways of organizing life on Earth (i.e. humans not as unique creatures, as all creatures are unique, but rather humans as exceptional beings). The second idea guiding this course is the IVM (the Interspecies Virtual Machine), which is a hypothesis for how to create connections between the diverse participants of planet Earth, those of organic and artificial origin. 

The goal of Santillán’s research is to connect biological and artificial, physical and virtual systems. How can these relationships be made tangible? Students joined in the process of conceptualizing ‘Antimundo.’ Over the course of the month, they created original audiovisual essays that addressed the ‘IVM.’ The final videos, prompted by the student’s own curiosity, lend diverse perspectives towards imagining what this radical future could look like. 

Santillán’s course pulled in students interested in topics such as land art, cybernetics, artificial intelligence, neurobiology, and more. What students learned over the course of the month weaved these concepts into a much larger hypothesis: that we, as humans, have critical symbiotic relationships with both the natural and artificial systems inhabiting our planet. What do we owe them, and what do they owe us?

Students in “Antimundo” watch a draft of a peer’s final audiovisual essay.

Meet Our Newest Resident Fellow

The Lunder Institute for American Art is excited to welcome Heather Flor Cron as its newest resident fellow. Cron will take up residence in Waterville in February for a semester of community building and creative collaboration.

Established in 2021, Lunder Institute residential fellowships provide artists with spacious studios as well as opportunities for collaboration with Colby College faculty, students, and staff, the Waterville community, and the Maine arts community. This studio program, based out of the Greene Block + Studios in downtown Waterville, Maine, encompasses artists at all stages of their careers and working in a range of artistic disciplines and mediums. Resident fellows are provided with housing and a stipend, have access to Colby College campus facilities, and are in dialogue with local organizations and community members.

Cron (she/they) is a queer Peruvian-American farmer, performer & transdisciplinary artist who works with intuitive movement, dirt, installation, printmaking, fiber, social practice and food. From a young age, she frequently traveled to Peru to visit her maternal family. There, her passion for movement, food and textiles was ignited. Cron lives in Portland, Maine, which is settled on stolen and occupied territory of the Wabanaki Confederacy. Through performance and object making, she locates the present moment and the relationship between her two cultures. She explores the defeat and transformation of trauma through the twin powers of vulnerability and forgiveness, and how exposing pain can transcend trauma.

Cron works and organizes with Presente! Maine, a grassroots organization which works to empower displaced indigenous and afro-Latinx peoples of Maine through survival programs, community power building, cultural celebration, and transformative healing practice. There she co-lead the Food Brigade project, a food survival program and the Cuidado Colectivo Program, a youth recreation day program. Cron has been featured in a number of group exhibitions including SPACE Gallery’s Re-Site, Able Baker Contemporary’s Undercurrents curated by Veronica Perez, and Speedwell Projects Can’t Take My Eyes Off You curated by Faythe Levine.

She is also the recipient of awards and residencies such as the Kindling Fund via Space Gallery / Andy Warhol Foundation, David C. Driskell Black Seed Studio Fellowship, Speedwell Projects Residency, Studios at MASS MoCA Fellowship and the Ellis Beauregard Foundation Residency.

Cron will join our continuing residential fellows, Tessa Greene O’Brien, a Maine-based artist and curator with a multi-faceted painting practice, and Dylan Hausthor, an artist based on the coast of Maine, who joined the Lunder Institute’s residential fellowship program during the fall 2022 semester.

Learn more about this group of artists and read their bios on our Spring 2023 Resident Fellows page.

Image: Heather Flor Cron.

First Friday, Downtown Waterville

First Fridays celebrate the vibrant creativity of Waterville by inviting people downtown to engage in multidisciplinary arts experiences. On the first Friday of every month, visit downtown Waterville to meet artists, participate in various workshops, listen to live music, eat delicious local food, and come together as a community.

Activities

Join us at the Paul J. Schupf Art Center, 93 Main Street:

Colby College Museum of Art’s Joan Dignam Schmaltz Gallery

  • 4–7 pm: Sketching at the Schmaltz
  • 4:30 pm: Tour of Light on Main Street with Siera Hyte, Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary
  • 6:30 pm: Tour of Light on Main Street with Kris Bergquist, Curator of Education and Engagement

Waterville Creates

Try! Make! Create!, 4–6 pm

Drop in to the Schupf Art Center to try, make, and create. Try a guided activity or choose your own adventure using materials in the Ticonic Studio.

Greene Block + Studios, 18 Main Street:

Where We Are Now: Maps and Doorways at Greene Block + Studios, 4– 6 pm

Interact with Where We Are Now, a paper-based installation by artist Maggie Libby. This year-long project interweaves themes and questions about Waterville’s present and past histories, including those of the Kennebec River, food, place, labor, higher education, and women’s life stories.

Center for Book & Print, 4–6 pm

Open Studio, and opportunities to view and interact with artists’ books from Special Collections at Colby College

Stay tuned for more First Friday, Downtown Waterville activities.